Professor Li Changshuan

Professor Li Changshuan

Biodata
Li Changshuan is a Professor and Deputy Dean of the Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation (former UN training Program for Translators and Interpreters), Beijing Foreign Studies University. He has been teaching and practising translation and interpretation since 1996 after graduation from this school. During this period, he also worked for the United Nations in New York, Geneva and Bangkok for short periods of time. He is still an offsite translator/reviser for the United Nations. Professor Li is also an active conference interpreter. He has interpreted hundreds of academic conferences, mostly in law. Professor Li (co)authored several books on the practice of translation and interpretation. He writes for a legal translation column in East Journal of Translation (Dongfang Fanyi).

Title

Critical Thinking and Research in Translation

Abstract

Machines search, humans research. The search ability of a machine allows it to present useful materials to a translator instantly, thus saving time for ensuring textual and terminological consistency. But the most crucial work of a translator is research, something that will be assisted by the Internet technology but never be replaced by a machine. The presentation will demonstrate through examples that translation is not a mechanical process of conversion, but a process of constant research and critical thinking to find out the truth and determine the appropriate form of expression.

 

 

Profesor Madya Minako O'Hagan

Associate Professor Dr. Minako O’Hagan

Biodata

Minako O’Hagan is Associate Professor at the School of Cultures, Languages and Linguistics (CLL, The University of Auckland), a position she took up in September 2016. Prior to joining CLL, she spent fourteen years in Dublin City University, Ireland, where she lectured in translation technology, multimedia translation and terminology. She specialises in research on translation technology and she has published extensive publications, including the co-authored, first monograph in Translation Studies on video games translation, published by John Benjamins: Game Localization: Translating for the Global Digital Entertainment Industry (O’Hagan and Mangiron 2013). She has an international research network of collaborators in Europe and Japan. Her latest collaboration includes an EU-funded project, the International Network on Crisis Translation (INTERACT) in which she is a project member. She also has a book contract with Routledge for the edited volume: The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Technology with Professor Tony Hartley (Rikkyo University) to be published in 2018. Her current work includes ethical and legal issues in non-professional translation in digital environments.

Title

Translating in the Age of AI, Participatory Culture and Mixed Reality: What defines human translation?

Abstract

This presentation shares my ongoing work to understand and reflect on the consequences of the deepening relationship between translation and technology in the rapidly changing technological landscape. Like many other professions translation is faced with uncertainties arising from new technology applications, including elements of AI. In particular, I will explore emerging trends and what is in store for the translation profession in reference to two examples of my recent work. In the context of participatory culture I will first discuss the significant impact of fans on commercial game localisation where fans’ desire to access a less mediated, hence more authentic version of the game leads to delocalisation. The second example is a proof-of-concept project which tested an augmented reality headset for the purpose of caption projection and generation. These examples demonstrate the evolving picture of increased influence of non-translators on how translation should be done and potential changes in how translation production and consumption are mediated in technologically enhanced environments. Added to the mix is the presence of AI with Neural MT (NMT) as an eagerly anticipated development. On the basis of the above observations I will attempt to tease out the critical issues arising for translators and the translation profession. Above all, I seek to reflect on the major question of what defines the essential quality of the human (professional) translation.

 

 

Associate Professor Hasuria Che Omar

Associate Professor Dr. Hasuria Che Omar

Biodata

Associate Professor Dr. Hasuria Che Omar has spent 22 years in the field of Translation Studies at the School of Humanities, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. She has published a multitude of works in the areas of Linguistics, Translation, Media and Communication as well as Literature and Education. She was also the Translators Coordinator for the books Penterjemahan Undang-undang (Translating Law) (2011) and Kejurubahasaan Komuniti Merentasi Sempadan (Crossing Borders in Community Interpreting) (2013). She specialises in research on audio-visual translation, transadaptation, media and translation, critical discourse analysis, and translator training. In the administrative department, she is currently Deputy Dean (Academic, Students and Alumni) at the School of Humanities, USM. She is also the Vice President of the Malaysian Translators Association, PPM. As of 2015, she had been appointed the Director of the International Conference on Translation, PPA three times (2009, 2013 and 2015), and the Chief of Secretariat for ITBM-PPM Translation Award (2012). Beginning 1st January 2017, she has been appointed as a Guest Writer at the Malaysian Institute of Language and Literature (DBP). 

Title

Intermodal Transfer in Creative Text: An analysis of the (trans)adaptation of comic into musical play

Abstract

The classical and ‘ideal’ definitions of translation will describe translation as the decoding and encoding of linguistic elements, which aims to achieve the maximum transfer of syntactic and semantic elements of the source language into the target language. Thus, in the context of translation, the concept of adaptation (Delabastita, 1989) or (trans)adaptation (Gambier, 2003) is said to be unacceptable as an ‘ideal’ or an ‘actual’ translation form, since both concepts are practically applied to the process of substitution of the verbal material of the source text with the corresponding material in the target text. These two terms also allow translators to transcend beyond the ordinary dichotomy of translation, and the orientation will be more towards the target audience. However, Oittinen’s (2000) view that “the main difference between translation and adaptation is based on our own attitudes and views, rather than by the concrete differences between them” needs to be taken into consideration. By focusing specifically on the examples from Lat’s Kampong Boy (1979) and Kampong Boy The Musical (2011), and, taking into account all the views above, this paper aims to discuss a) how far the transadaptation concept is applicable to describe the musical theater as an intermodal product, b) how does the ‘untranslated’ and ‘over translated’ parts affect the final product, c) what is the form of surtitles provided in the final product and, d) to what extent the definition of ‘ideal’ linguistic translation is used in this transadaptation. Based on the idea of an adaptation mode by Bastin (in Baker, 1998) this paper will also illustrate the final product of this transadaptation.

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